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BAMM’s Mosaic of the Year 2014: Tessa Hunkin & the Hackney Mosaic Project Change A Community With Art

The Romans would have approved.

Tessa_Hunkin_Varieties_PeakingDog_PhotoTH

The British Association for Modern Mosaic (BAMM) recently announced that Tessa Hunkin and The Hackney Mosaic Project have received the Mosaic of the Year Award for a stunning body of work that encompasses two public installations in London; Shepherdess Walk and Hoxton Varieties.

(For full view of images, please click to enlarge)

"Shepherdess Walk" Full view with all panels and pavements  Photo:  Lillian Sizemore

“Shepherdess Walk” Full view with all panels and pavements   Commissioned by Hackney Council    Photo: Lillian Sizemore

Shepherdess Walk detail    Photo courtesy Lillian Sizemore

Shepherdess Walk detail Photo courtesy Lillian Sizemore

"Hoxton Varieties" (2012) Tessa Hunkin & The Hackney Mosaic Project  Photo courtesy of the artist

“Hoxton Varieties” (2014) Tessa Hunkin & The Hackney Mosaic Project  Commissioned by Sainsbury’s     Photo courtesy of the artist

"Hoxton Varieties" Detail  Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

“Hoxton Varieties” Detail Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

The Jury, which consisted of Dr. Will Wooten, Lecturer in Roman Art at Kings College, Norma Vondee, President of BAMM, and your editor, was in total unison in the decision to shine a a spotlight on a series of works that are not only visually brilliant – they have changed lives.

Dr. Wooten:  A Tour de force in the continued refinement of a modern visual vocabulary for figurative mosaic art.

Tessa Hunkin & The Hackney Mosaic Project "Shepherdess Walk: Autumn Winter" (2012)

Tessa Hunkin & The Hackney Mosaic Project “Shepherdess Walk: Autumn Winter” (2012)     Photo courtesy of the artist

Norma Vondee:  Evergreen mosaic master at her height; relentless clarification, determination, curiosity, finish and humanity.

Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

"Shepherdess Walk" Detail  Photo courtesy Lillian Sizemore

“Shepherdess Walk” Detail Photo courtesy Lillian Sizemore

Nancie Mills Pipgras:  Brilliant modernization of an ancient aesthetic.  Clear, concise, joy-filled imagery made by volunteers.  Art that has changed a neighborhood.

Hunkin, an accomplished mosaic maker and author, acted as the designer of the projects, a role the Romans called the pictor imaginarius.  Her love and appreciation for the critical design components of ancient mosaics has created a lively, modern aesthetic that delights and resonates. Hunkin’s Hoxton pups are the obvious direct descendants of the hounds of the 1st Century AD.

"Hoxton Varieites" Detail  Photo courtesy of the artist

“Hoxton Varieites” Detail Photo courtesy of the artist

Hare Hunting 1st Century AD

Hare Hunting 1st Century AD   Photo via Wikipedia

Equally impressive to the jurors was the fact that these mosaics were all made by volunteers. The Hackney Mosaic Project is comprised of local community members and clients of Lifeline, an organization devoted to helping people recover from drug and alcohol addiction.  These are mosaics made by the people for the people – and they are of astonishing quality.

Photo courtesy of the artist

Photo courtesy of the artist

"Shepherdess Walk" Detail  Photo courtesy Lillian Sizemore

“Shepherdess Walk” Detail Photo courtesy Lillian Sizemore

 

Photo courtesy of the artist

Photo courtesy of the artist

Photo courtesy of the artist

Photo courtesy of the artist

"Hoxton Varieties" Detail  Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

“Hoxton Varieties” Detail Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

Signatures of the makers are always included prominently in the design of the mosaics.

Photo courtesy Lillian Sizemore

Photo courtesy Lillian Sizemore

Just this week, Hunkin and The Hackney Mosaic Project unveiled their most recent accomplishment – The Hackney Downs Park Pavilion. British comedian Russell Brand positively nails the spirit of the project in this impromptu dedication.

The open-air theater is a mosaic menagerie with charming bugs and beasties of all shapes and sizes.

Hackney Downs Park Theater    Photo courtesy Norma Vondee

Hackney Downs Park Theater Photo courtesy Norma Vondee

Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

Tessa Hunkin   Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

Tessa Hunkin     Photo courtesy Spitalfieldslife.com

Another joyous, welcoming environment by Tessa Hunkin and The Hackney Mosaic Project has been added to the London landscape – thanks in great part to the Hackney Council which has funded and promoted the projects. What lackluster space will these mighty mosaic collaborators transform next?

RESOURCES

LOCATIONS

  • Shepherdess Walk  Shepherdess Walk, London N1 7JN (Northeast Corner)
  • Hoxton Varieties – Sainsbury’s Local Store, 245 Old Street EC1V 9EY (Corner of Pitfield St)
  • Hackney Downs Park

 

 

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A Natural History Museum in Mosaic Rises in Chile: Isidora Paz López

Outside of Santiago, Chile something magical is happening.

A concrete jungle of a metro station is becoming a brilliant, shimmering natural history museum. A community wracked by drugs and violence is reconnecting with itself and its natural heritage. And a cadre of young artists with no formal training in the art form is becoming one of the most accomplished mosaic teams on the planet.

Meet Isidora Paz López, sculptor, ceramicist, visionary and Artistic Director for a project that will cover the 84 pillars of the metro station in Puente Alto, Chile with mosaic. The 37 year old mother of two is determined that she and her crew of 32 people will complete all of the pillars – an estimated 2,500 square meters of mosaic – in just 12 months.

It was the mayor of Puento Alto, Manuel José Ossandon, who gave López the pillar challenge. As his last term as mayor was ending, Ossandon wanted to leave behind a gift to the community – something big, something bold, something transformational.  It started with mosaicing two long walls in the station.  These mosaics depicting the nearby mountain ranges at sunrise and sunset would be the first time that art would be incorporated into metro station in Chile.

When that ground-breaking project was completed, the mayor turned  to López once again, this time with the prospect of covering the 84 pillars.  At first, Lopez was daunted, “Impossible!  Too ambitious!”  Then, she was inspired.

We created the concept of showing the flora and fauna of our area and to do it from micro to macro. People would discover in the mosaics all of the amazing nature that we have around us.  There would be images of all sorts of animal, insect and plant life.  At the bottom of each pillar would be the scientific and common names for each species, so there would be be an educational contribution to the city as well. – Isidora Paz López

Right now, 52 of the pillars are complete and another three underway.  The deadline for all 84 pillars is the end of October.

Simply put, the pillars are fantastic – alive with a vibrancy and joyfulness that is captivating. Insects, birds, reptiles, mammals, flowers, herbs, cacti, the large, the small, the intimidating, the adorable – all manner of species are represented in a graphic style that lends itself beautifully to mosaic technique.  Major elements are outlined with a thick black line that really makes them “pop” forward for the viewer. Even with limited access to tile, López and her team have created a cohesive palette that holds the 84 pillars together without a single visual glitch. The mosaics are engaging, stunning and elegant.

The challenge we have at the moment is to finish on time.  We are making the central figures of the mosaics with so much love that we take more time than we expect with every one.  We don’t want to reduce the quality of our work for the quantity of our work, so the challenge is to do it in the most fantastic and efficient way that we can.

Arana Pollito by Isidora López

López’ organization for making the mosaics is very similar to the way work was divided among ancient Roman mosaic workers.

Working in teams, we have four groups:  The Artists who make the designs and execute the principal figures in the mosaics, the Helpers who work alongside the Artists in creating the principal figures, the Background group, most of whom are students, who fill in the solid colors, and finally the Grouting group who also move the scaffolding for us from pillar to pillar.  We are 32 workers in total and we work Monday through Friday, six hours a day.

Each pillar starts with a photograph, sometimes one taken by López’ husband, German nature photographer Chris Lukhaup.  The pillar is then assigned to an individual artist (“Head of Pillar”) who is in charge of the four to six people will work with him/her.  After an overall design is agreed upon, all work of the work is executed on site.

On average it takes two weeks and 16 people to complete one pillar – and remember, there are 84 of them – and a deadline only three months away.

When we start a new pillar, we make a total visualization of the work, choosing the colors and also the language that we will use for the design.  Language is what we call the type of cuts we use, for example “feathers”, “scales”, “squares”, etc.

Asked if she has a favorite pillar, López says

It is hard to chose one, but at the moment it is the dragonfly.  It was a challenge for me to do because of the complex symmetry.  Now that it is complete, I really like the transparent effect of the wings a lot, but  – every week there is a new favorite.

Cruising through the hundreds of photos on López’ Facebook page, we found a couple of favorites . . . this fellow with his beautifully articulated fur, for one.

Then there’s this slithery charmer with his exquisitely shaped scales.

And, there is something about this face that just makes us giggle.

López says that the support from the Municipality of Puento Alto has been outstanding.

Our salaries (nice for artists!) and all of the materials are paid for by the Municipality of Puento Alto and I am grateful for their strong support of what we are doing.  Not only do I have the chance to select the people who will work with me, but the city has given me complete artistic control as well.  They also have provided us with a crew who help us with preparing the pillars – cleaning them and removing all graffiti before we begin, moving materials, security and making the scaffolding.  We could not do this without them.

When asked what she intends to do when the project is done, López says:

I don’t know!  This is a “dream job” – we do what we like and it has been wonderful to be assured of a good salary for almost a year!  I feel that many good things will come.  We have learned a lot as individual mosaicists but also as a group.  All that we know about organization, the dynamics of work, our systems and the unique style of our designs we have learned as we worked.  I don’t want to lose all of what we have gained as a team so my greatest hope is to continue working with this group of people and to fill up the streets with our art.

 

And the community’s response?

Every day people stop to comment on how beautiful the mosaics are and to thank us for what we are doing.  Some people leave the metro at the station before this one just so they can walk part of the way home to see the mosaics.  Others come from far away just to see what we are doing and to congratulate us.  We have also noticed that many of the neighbors have become interested in mosaic; they come by in the afternoons to collect leftover tile shards for use in their own homes.

“Creative Placemaking” is a term we came upon this week in an art publication.  It was used to describe “art projects that have enlivened and enhanced neighborhoods and communities.”  We think that is exactly what Ms. López and her group are doing in Puente Alto.  This is as stunning a public art project as we have seen anywhere.  It is also one of the most ambitious – its schedule, its scope, its beauty, its intention – everything is outsized and over-the-top.

With all that they have gained through this experience, we can see the mosaicists of Puente Alto packing their nippers to travel to distant cities to do a lot more Creative Placemaking.

 

It is now our pleasure to introduce you to the Pillar Team of Puente Alto.

Bravo a todos!

The Pillar Team of Puente Alto including:  Artistic Director Isidora Paz López, Alejandra Guzmán, Paulo Meyer, Valeria Merino, Carolina González, Gonzalo San Martín, Hector Velozo, Javiera Melo, Soledad Fuentealba, Nicolás Chacón, Sabrina Morgado, Catalina Larraín, Isabel González, José Olivos, Paloma Cale, Felipe Olivos

MORE MOSAIC IN PUENTE ALTO:  The success of the Pillar Project inspired the City to commission López and her crew to cover still more Metro installations.  There is now a total of over 3,000 sq meters of mosaic.  See our update with more fabulous photos HERE

RESOURCES

  • Our 2014 story on the completed mosaics in Andamento, the journal of the British Association for Modern Mosaic

  • A MAN update on the project with meters of new work can be found here
  • More photos of the project can be found on López’ Facebook Page www.facebook.com/isidorapaz
  • López can be contacted via email at:  vientoisis@hotmail.com

 

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18

Aug
2011

5 Comments

In Artists
Collaborations
Featured

By man-admin

A Collaborative Tour de Force by Sam Gilliam and Stephen Miotto

On 18, Aug 2011 | 5 Comments | In Artists, Collaborations, Featured | By man-admin

In May of this year, the Washington DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities unveiled what one art lover has described as “the most beautiful mosaic in the city” in the Takoma Metro Rail Station.

Sam Giliam "From A Model to A Rainbow" (2011) Takoma Station

Sam Giliam “From A Model to A Rainbow” (2011) Takoma Station

Designed by DC’s beloved artist Sam Gilliam and brought to life in glass and ceramic by Miotto Mosaics, From a Model to a Rainbow is, quite simply, a collaborative tour de force.

Gilliam_Model_To_A_Rainbow_Artist1

Gilliam_From_A_Model_Detail1 Photos by Richard Holzsager  Click to enlarge for glorious details.

Sam Gilliam (b. November 30, 1933) is internationally recognized as one of America’s foremost Color Field Painter and Lyrical Abstractionist artists. Gilliam, an African American, is associated with the Washington Color School and is broadly considered a Color field painter. His works have also been described as belonging to Abstract Expressionism and Lyrical Abstraction. He works on stretched, draped, and wrapped canvas, and adds sculptural 3D elements. He is recognized as the first artist to introduce the idea of a painted canvas hanging without stretcher bars c.1965, a major contribution to the Color Field School.  – Wikipedia

In the video of dedication ceremonies below, Gilliam speaks about his inspiration for the work while citizens talk about the mural’s impact in bringing the Takoma Park and Washington DC communities closer together.  What more could one ask of public art?

Recently, MAN spoke with Gilliam’s assistant of 30 years, Stephen Frietch and mosaic artisan Stephen Miotto, the man responsible for the making of From a Model to a Rainbow and many of the extraordinary mosaics found in the NY subways.   Quite honestly, the enthusiasm for the project expressed by both of these men is difficult for us to convey here.

Luckily, we found this PBS video on the project where you can see/feel that enthusiasm.  Listen for comments from Gilliam like “as if it’s actually flapping out of doors” and “these colors have the feeling that they are in water”– testaments to the artistry of the mosaicists who worked from his original computer generated image.

In our interview, Frietch said, “The mosaic is like a translation.  They (the mosaicists) took unexpected liberties.  We learned to trust them.” Miotto, based New York, provided us with the following photos of the mosaic’s creation in the Travisanutto Studio in Italy.

 Photos courtesy Stephen Miotto
Here, we see Gilliam’s original design propped up against the wall next to a completed section.  Smalti “pizzas” of various colors are placed on the table for consideration while, to the far right, an artisan works with a palette of yellows.
Miotto’s association with Giovanni Travisanutto dates back to 1971.  A newly minted graduate of the Scuola Mosaicisti del Friuli in Spilimbergo, Travisanutto traveled to NY to work in the Crovatto  mosaic studio where he met the young Miotto.   Travisanutto convinced Miotto to train at Spilimbergo.  For lovers of contemporary mosaics, the influence of Spilimbergo is very evident in this work.
 Photos courtesy Stephen Miotto

Gilliam’s original design was extraordinarily complex; colors shifted, melded and draped from one shape and plane to another.  In the studio photo above, one can appreciate how the artisans achieved that complexity with astonishing accuracy using the mosaic components of color, texture and andamento.  There isn’t a curved tesserae to be found and yet the completed work exudes fluidity.

Gilliam_Model_To_A_Rainbow_Artist1  Photo courtesy Sam Gilliam

150-dpi-gilliam-mural-141

Gilliam and Frietch spent time in the Travisanutto Studio with Miotto during the execution of the mosaic.  Said Frietch, “There you are at the foot of the Dolomite mountains with your seventeen year old son watching the master (Giovanni Travisanutto), a 70 or 80 year old man make art the same way it has been made for thousands of years . . . it just doesn’t get any better.”

No, it doesn’t.

Says Miotto:  You can’t copy a work of art (in mosaic).  You have to recreate it in a way that is honest to what the artist wants.

And that would be the difference between simple fabrication and making art.

Our sincere thanks to Sam Gilliam, Stephen Frietch and Stephen Miotto for their assistance with this post.  We could have gone on for days.

Enjoy –  Nancie

Resources:

Takoma Metro Rail Station, 327 Cedar Street NW, Washington DC
Recent works by Sam Gilliam Marsha Mateyka Gallery
Miotto Mosaics, Stephen Miotto: Tel. 845.628.8496 Fax. 845.628.1845
Website for Travisanutto Studio 
More photos by Richard Holzager of the mural and its installation at TacomaDC
Previous MAN Posts on Stephen Miotto:
Stephen Miotto Interviewed in His Studio, here
Community Garden:  An Award Winning Mosaic by Stephen Miotto here

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