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26

Sep
2014

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Creating a New Identity for Mosaic: The GAEM Prize 2013

Even as Ravenna Italy is the eternal steward of mosaic’s Byzantine past, it is also the incubator for the art form’s dynamic future.

This is no more evident than in the Young Artists and Mosaic (GAEM) competition, a biennial contest hosted by the Art Museum of the City of Ravenna (MAR) in conjunction with the international mosaic festival, RavennaMosaico. Invited artists under the age of 40 are asked to create works that “should deal with the constitutive, formal & poetic language of mosaic.” (MAN article on 2011 GAEM here.)

This is where the very nature of mosaic is poked, prodded, and, if successful, expanded.  In 2013, this included the use of nails and felt, an audience-participatory build-your-own-ceramic hamburger and a luscious video of a man and woman painting tesserae on one another – imagine those Byzantine icons coming alive. Even in the crowded traffic-jam of Notte d’Oro last October, we were mesmerized by many of the works and quite honestly flumoxed by others.

Kim Jae Hee "Corea del Sud" (Uncomfortable House) 2010 40 x 40 cm Nails & felt  Photo courtesy MAR

Jae Hee Kim (South Korea) “Corea del Sud” (Uncomfortable House) 2010 40 x 40 cm . Nails & felt    Photo courtesy MAR

Photo courtesy MAR

Photo courtesy MAR

Silvia Naddeo NTMP

Silvia Naddeo “My Panino” 2013. Multimedia. Variable size       Photo: NTMP

Silvia Naddeo "My Panino" 2013 Detail  Photo: MAN

Silvia Naddeo “My Panino” 2013 Detail      Photo: NTMP

Takako Hirai (Japan) won the Traditional Technique Award for her absolutely stunning Vene which appeared to be the construction, destruction, and reassembly of an organic shape that seemed ready to depart from the wall at any second.

Takako Hirai "Vene" 2013  150 x 150 cm. Marble, mortar. Photo: NTMP

Takako Hirai “Vene” 2013 150 x 150 cm. Marble, mortar. Photo: NTMP

Takako_Hirai_Vene_2013_detail_PhotoNTMP

Takako Hirai “Vene” 2013 detail Photo: NTMP

Andrea Poma (Italy) took the Experimental Prize for his brilliant Impressioni – a work which turned the mosaic component of “interstice” on its ear.  Poma used an etched piece of glass to project the shadow of spaces between tesserae onto a wall – as opposed to those shadowy spaces being created by the indentations in a wall covered in mosaic.

Andrea Poma "Impressioni" 2013  90 x 130 cm  Glass.

Andrea Poma “Impressioni” 2013 90 x 130 cm Glass.  Photo courtesy MAR

Andrea Pomoa "Impressioni" Detail  Photo: NTMP

Andrea Poma “Impressioni” Detail             Photo: NTMP

These are not your nonna’s mosaics – to be sure.  They are surprisingly cerebral, engaging and beautiful. But . . . are these musings on an ancient, time-consuming, historically pedantic art form relevant today? Or, as Exhibit Curator Linda Kniffitz puts it:

“Does mosaic still possess an autonomous, expressive power outside of the confines of Ravenna’s strong identity as a custodian of this ancient and highly symbolic art?”

What follows are the thoughtful and illuminating Exhibition catalogue essays by Curator Kniffitz, who is also the Director of the Center for International Documentation of Mosaic at MAR, and her co-curator for the 2013 GAEM, Daniele Torcellini, art critic and professor at the Academy of Fine Art Ravenna and Genoa. They offer knowledgeable, passionate responses to the questions above and in the process touch on art history, criticism, current art world trends, and the nature of art vs craft — all within the context of the glorious possibilities that mosaic has to offer. This is heady stuff for mosaic makers and nerds alike. Take your time and enjoy! – Nancie

Finding an Identity for Mosaic – Linda Kniffitz

When we initiated the GAEM competition in 2011, our intent was to stimulate a discourse on contemporary art in relation to mosaic and in doing so, to create a moment of comparison between makers from different schools and countries. In 2013, we received another set of very positive contributions in terms of both the richness of the visions proposed and the international provenance of the young artists.

But why indeed should we dedicate a competition to a technique that appears to be so complex and slow compared to the current trends in the visual arts that no longer envisages linearity and narration, but instead reward circularity, contamination and the use of different means of expression?

Does mosaic still possess an autonomous expressive power outside of the confines of Ravenna’s strong identity as a custodian of this ancient and highly symbolic art?

Raffaella Ceccarossi "Emerging" 2013 37 x 140 x 12 cm  Smalti and marble.

Raffaella Ceccarossi “Emerging” 2013 37 x 140 x 12 cm Smalti and marble.   Photo courtesy MAR

In its beginnings, mosaic was associated with the strong political purposes and economic investments (carefully chosen imagery, precious materials, highly specialized artisans, ) that forged it into a supremely stately instrument.  In the last decades of the 19th century, it was rediscovered for its inherently symbolic character in an anti-Impressionist and anti-Naturalist function.  The young art critic George Aurier, in championing the acceptance of Symbolism, spurred the revival of medieval visual art forms like mosaic and mural decoration.

In the 30s, the Futurist painter Gino Severini (whose name is now synonymous with modern mosaic) extolled the virtues of mosaic not for its value as a surface covering, but for its extraordinary capacity to express a synthesis – to condense an entire meaning into a single stylized, highly representative sign.

Luca Barberini "Portraits Collection" 2013  Variable size.  Smalti and marble.

Luca Barberini “Portraits Collection” 2013 Variable size. Smalti and marble.  Photo NTMP

The Exposition of Contemporary Mosaics of 1959 in Ravenna organized by mosaic author and historian Giuseppi Bovini signaled the beginning of a multi-decade long discussion of mosaic and its place as an art form.  In the 1990s, mosaic’s “right to be” within the contemporary artistic landscape was championed by Italian art critic, painter and philosopher Gillo Dorfles who initially defined it as a “super modern medium of expression.” In the end, however, he unfortunately came to look at mosaic solely within the context of artistic “design-object”, a phrase which smacks of refined craft.

Luca Barberini "Portraits Collection" 2013  Variable size. Smalti and marble.

Luca Barberini “Portraits Collection” 2013 Variable size. Smalti and marble.  Photo courtesy MAR

During the last decade, more voices have joined the debate about mosaic’s place from Bruno Bandini to Daniele Astrolog Abadal and to younger critics, in particular those from the Romagna region.

Luca Barberini "Portraits Colection" 2013 Various sizes. Smalti & marble. Photo courtesy MAR

Luca Barberini “Portraits Colection” 2013 Various sizes. Smalti & marble.   Photo courtesy MAR

In the twenty-first century, the time has come to circumvent all of these deliberations and endow mosaic with an identity – a term out of fashion, perhaps, but still useful.  Mosaic needs an identity that must be directed and defined – squeezed for all its worth in order to extract its meaning and possible new directions.  Mosaic possesses visual characteristics which capture attention because they are not accessible with a single glance; in order to really appreciate a mosaic, it is necessary to not only explore the perceived image created in the medium, but the relational properties of the individual pieces that compose the image.

In looking for an identity for mosaic, it is also necessary to clear the field of the production of many famous contemporary artists who may utilize certain elements of mosaic like fragmentation and the recomposition of elements in the construction of an image, but have not consciously chosen to create a mosaic.  English art philosopher and author David Davies  states that it is not possible to appreciate art in a purely perceptive way disassociated from any contextual knowledge.  This is especially important if the implementation is mosaic.  An artist is obviously free to express an inspiration in whatever technique he wishes thus affirming his autonomy. But, if he decides to use a technique like mosaic, he chooses an approach that has some specific characteristics that drive the work such as the synthesis and simplification of the sign, the fragmentation and recomposition of constituent elements.

Mosaïzm "Gallaxizm" 2013  250 x 250 x 250 cm. Multimedia installation.

Mosaïzm “Gallaxizm” 2013 250 x 250 x 250 cm. Multimedia installation.  Photo courtesy MAR

All of these characteristics of mosaic can be expressed in many forms; can depart from the use of inert materials, can embrace installations and even video art.  A shadow projected onto a wall from a sheet of etched glass offers the shapes of shimmering tiles.  Drops of silicone, each laden with its own microstory, executes a larger narrative in the course of the tesserae.  The installation of lights in a dark room provokes the same awe that grasped ancient visitors to the Mausoleum of Galla Placidia.

Mosaïzm "Gallaxiam" 2013 Detail  Photo courtesy MAR

Mosaïzm “Gallaxiam” 2013 Detail Photo courtesy MAR

From a different perspective, the unconventional use of mosaic tiles to create a table of fast food that transforms the surface-observer into a product developing-maker.

These are all examples of a centuries-long journey begun with enamels, mortars and scaffolding; mosaic reinventing itself in shapes and instruments always new; it would be ill-advised to attempt an inventory.

Critical Issues – Daniele Torcellini

How could I handle a critical text on mosaic works in Ravenna in 2013?  The subject of the discourse is inherently difficult.

The mosaic.  Poised between ancient glories, romanticism and modernisms that reopened a road, a contemporaneity discontinuous but conceptually expanding. Even the place is not immune to difficulties. Ravenna. The privileged location; sensitive, yes, a natural observatory. But, it obscures a hazard; a codification of mosaic that does not represent all the possibilities of the mosaic. And then, broadening the field of vision, a centre emerges clearly unresolved. the mosaic, or rather, the works that are done in mosaic by those who make mosaics, or even some of an extreme derivation, choices, are almost lacking a critical approach in a systematic, recognized code.

Laura Carraro “Breath” 2013 123 x 40 cm. Stone, marble, tile, silicone tubing, PVC, inverted mirror. Photo courtesy MAR

Except for a few, and even good, isolated voices, the absence is felt of a trend in which my text will be received, making it primed for the likeminded or hardened against ideas not shared. There is no lack of theory – Filiberto Menna in The Criticism of Criticism, 1980, would be a good starting point – but of critical practice. A debate that allows collecting ideas, proposals, suggestions – that takes stock of the situation, that contextualizes, that defines the playing field, that interprets and evaluates and asks itself about its role.

Laura Carraro "Breath" 2013 Detail   Photo: NTMP

Laura Carraro “Breath” 2013 Detail Photo: NTMP

To break the ice, I would like to emphasize how in this contemporary world – wherein technical boundaries are now weak, where things overrun into each other without discrimination, the admixtures kept under watch by the critics and the markets – the choice to oxidize one’s expressive aspirations around an idea – fixed, self-limiting, of dubious association as it is considered – and often wrongly – that the mosaic appears both brave (a dip back into the tank of liquid contemporaneity as a springboard for something that is not old-school and not even vintage), and not very significant in terms of the results achieved (“today you can say anything any way” is the opinion of some). But, it is a choice, that of the mosaic, which in the end appears beyond the distinctions between the liberal arts and mechanical arts – artistic techniques and decorative techniques – with all the related hierarchies of values. A visual, aesthetic and expressive and perhaps even scientific search for meaning, can be made with mosaic as with any other medium or combination of media.

Matylda Tracewska "Untitled" 60 x 48 cm. Marble and paint.

Matylda Tracewska “Untitled” 60 x 48 cm. Marble, paint.  Photo courtesy MAR

One the role of the medium, even in its relation mostly to physics – of the environment in which a phenomenon plays out – my reflection would find a stopping point.  The medium determines the result; it circumscribes the possibilities, insinuates itself under the skin of the message (it is the message, as Marshall McLuhan suggested, adding that the content of a medium is another medium).

Matilda Tracewska "Untitled" detail  Photo:  NTMP

Matilda Tracewska “Untitled” detail Photo: NTMP

And mosaic as a medium – an artistic medium – has specific characteristics that define it clearly, that trace a story and articulate a closeness, that, after all, allows moving well, more or less easily, inside them, generating waste, deviance, obsessions that are the key to reading a present and active vision. So – Hamlet’s question is raised – is it necessary that the text take a turn to a “critique of the mosaic” tout court?  No.  I would say not.  I would try to avoid a “critique of the mosaic”. I would prefer to remain in the area of a critique of visual art, however, that knows how to direct its attention to what is created in mosaic, recovering in the same medium the parameters which are the basis of discourse.

Elena Prosperi "Wakan-Tanka" 2013  60 x 198 cm  Tiffany glass, glass metal leaf, stones, feathers.

Elena Prosperi “Wakan-Tanka” 2013 60 x 198 cm Tiffany glass, glass metal leaf, stones, feathers.

But, this way I find myself in a flash adopting an approach of medium specificity, of an old-fashioned modernist? In debt to the views of Clement Greenberg? An approach pre-postmedial? That’s not done. I could also frame the multiple experiences that today revolve around the mosaic in the conceptual category far more fresh in coinage of metamodernism – recklessly running the risk that it appears little more than a banner with a dusting of novelty – insubstantial. So, the two theorists of the metamodernism movement, Timotheus Vermeulen and Robin van den Akker, lucidly surmise the present on the pages of metamodernism.com: “The metamodern structure of feeling evokes an oscillation between a modern desire for sense and a postmodern doubt about the sense of it all, between a modern sincerity and a postmodern irony [...] between control and commons and craftsmanship and conceptualism and pragmatism and utopianism. Indeed, metamodernism is an oscillation.”

Benedetta Galli "We Are The 99" 2013 140 x 200 cm  Photos and silicone on canvas.

Benedetta Galli “We Are The 99″ 2013 140 x 200 cm Photos and silicone on canvas.  Photo courtesy MAR.

Benedetta Galli "We Are The 99" Detail   Photo courtesy MAR

Benedetta Galli “We Are The 99″ Detail Photo courtesy MAR

The frame and methodology defined, my personal inclinations, oriented in the direction for the sense, postmodernly uncertain, of sight, and thereabout, for truth, I have already had occasion to express myself, and I would finally take over.  The themes of light and colour, but in their more symbolic and les scientific meanings. The relationship with optical art, in an investigation of the infinite possibilities of repetition in modular structures. Thus, the aesthetics of the movement – already in the ekphrasis of early Christian and Byzantine mosaics – from the point of view of those who are regard, consequently, of what is regarded. And, I would also put on the plate, trying to avoid any simplistic terms, those attitudes and those procedures called “mosaic” that the contemporary visual culture, throughout the twentieth century, witness and saw spread – already clearly suggested by Renato Barilli in his reading of the method of George Seurat. From the mosaic screens of the first colour photographs to screens of pixels and in between the works of artists like Ellsworth Kelly, Gerhard Richter, and Thomas Ruff.

Ellsworth Kelly "Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance 1" 1951  Via museumsyndicate.com

Ellsworth Kelly “Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance 1″ 1951 Via museumsyndicate.com

Gerard Richter "1025 Farben" 1974  254 x 254 cm      Photo via Gerard-Richter.com

Gerard Richter “1025 Farben” 1974 254 x 254 cm Photo via Gerard-Richter.com

 

Thomas Ruff "jpeg icbm01" (2007)  242.6 x 184.8 cm  Photo via davidzwirner.com

Thomas Ruff “jpeg icbm01″ (2007) 242.6 x 184.8 cm Photo via davidzwirner.com

But why not, also the boldest combinations, Jodi, Castern Nicolai and many, many others.

Castern Nicolai "Unidisplay"  Via collabcubed.com

Castern Nicolai “Unidisplay” Via collabcubed.com

I would not ignore also the most critical perspectives and conceptual practice of appropriation, citation and translation of the messages of others from Sherrie Levine to Vik Muniz and around which the mosaic has fought in battles with uncertain outcomes.

Vic Muniz "Vic, 2 Years Old, Album." 2014 via designmilk.com

Vic Muniz “Vic, 2 Years Old, Album.” 2014 via designmilk.com

But what, finally, are the specificities of the mosaic as a medium today?  Some hypotheses. Fragmenting to give meaning. Decomposing to recompose, leaving in sight the signs of the process. The allure of seeing through and the charm of seeing a texture, a grid – even as theorised by Rosalind Krauss – more or less regular or intricate, dense or sparse. A proximal view and a distal view. Seeing the surface and the representation, seeing the surface generate a representation. Seeing yourself see.

GAEM 2013 Artists:

PS:  September 20 through November 9th 2014, MAR is hosting another Young Artists and Mosaic exhibit “Eccentric Mosaic” with 26 invited artists including many seen above. This exhibit is being shown in conjunction with a solo exhibit by Toyoharu Kii, “Whites & Blue” and the entrants in the city’s recent Visual Mosaic: Ravenna Video Contest. More info here.

Kim Jae Hee Corea del sud2010

Kim Jae Hee "Corea del Sud" (Uncomfortable House) 2010 40 x 40 cm Nails & felt Photo courtesy MAR

Kim Jae Hee Corea del Sud 2010 Detail

Photo courtesy MAR

Silvia Naddeo NTMP

Silvia Naddeo (Italy) "My Panino" 2013 Multimedia. Variable size.

Silvia_Naddeo_My_Panino_2013_Detail_NTMP

Silvia Naddeo "My Panino" 2013 Detail Photo: MAN

Andrea_Sala_Giulia_Alecci_Co-musivo_2-12_video

Andrea Sala & Giulia Alecci "Co-musivo" 2013 Video

Takako_Hirai_Vene_2013_NTMP

Takako Hirai "Vene" 2013 150 x 150 cm. Marble, mortar. Photo: NTMP

010_Takako Hirai_detail

 

Takako_Hirai_Vene_2013_detail_PhotoNTMP

 

016_Andrea Poma

Andrea Poma "Impressioni" 2013 90 x 130 cm Glass.

Andrea_Poma_Impressioni_2013_PhotoNTMP

Andrea Pomoa "Impressioni" Detail Photo: NTMP

Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly "Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance 1" 1951 Via museumsyndicate.com

GerhardRichterAbstraktesBild1992

Gerhard Richter "Abstraktes Bild" 1992

Thomas Ruff

Thomas Ruff "Barcelona Pavilion" 2000-2004

Castern Nicolai

Castern Nicolai "Unidisplay" Via collabcubed.com

Screen Shot 2014-09-25 at 6.15.18 PM

Vic Muniz "Vic, 2 Years Old, Album." 2014 via designmilk.com

006_Raffaella Ceccarossi

Raffaella Ceccarossi "Emerging" 2013 37 x 140 x 12 cm Smalti and marble.

001_Luca Barberini

Luca Barberini "Portraits Collection" 2013 Variable size. Smalti and marble.

Luca_Barberini_Portraits_Gaem_NTMP

Luca Barberini "Portraits Collection" 2013 Variable size. Smalti and marble.

003_Luca Barberini

Luca Barberini "Portraits Collection" 2013 Variable sizes. Smalti and marble.

004_Luca Barberini

Luca Barberini "Portraits Colection" 2013 Various sizes. Smalti & marble. Photo courtesy MAR

014_Mosaizm

Mosaïzm "Gallaxizm" 2013 250 x 250 x 250 cm. Multimedia installation.

013_Mosaizm_detail

Mosaïzm "Gallaxiam" 2013 Detail Photo courtesy MAR

005_Laura Carraro

Laura Carraro "Breath" 2013 123 x 40 cm. Stones, marble, tile, silicone tubing, PVC, inverted mirror. Photo courtesy MAR

Laura_Carraro_Breath_Detail_NTMP

Laura Carraro "Breath" 2013 Detail Photo: NTMP

020_Matylda Tracewska

Matylda Tracewska "Untitled" 60 x 48 cm. Marble and paint.

Matilda_Tracewska_Untitled_Detail_NTMP

Matilda Tracewska "Untitled" detail Photo: NTMP

007_Benedetta Galli

Benedetta Galli "We Are The 99" 2013 140 x 200 cm Photos and silicone on canvas.

008_Benedetta Galli_detail

Benedetta Galli "We Are The 99" Detail Photo courtesy MAR

018_Elena Prosperi

Elena Prosperi "Wakan-Tanka" 2013 60 x 198 cm Tiffany glass, glass metal leaf, stones, feathers.

1025Farben

Gerard Richter "1025 Farben" 1974 254 x 254 cm Photo via Gerard-Richter.com

2007-RUFTH0607

Thomas Ruff "jpeg icbm01" (2007) 242.6 x 184.8 cm Photo via davidzwirner.com

Kim Jae Hee "Corea del Sud" (Uncomfortable House) 2010 40 x 40 cm Nails & felt  Photo courtesy MAR Photo courtesy MAR Silvia Naddeo (Italy) "My Panino" 2013  Multimedia. Variable size. Silvia Naddeo "My Panino" 2013 Detail  Photo: MAN Andrea Sala & Giulia Alecci "Co-musivo" 2013  Video Takako Hirai "Vene" 2013  150 x 150 cm. Marble, mortar. Photo: NTMP 010_Takako Hirai_detail Takako_Hirai_Vene_2013_detail_PhotoNTMP Andrea Poma "Impressioni" 2013  90 x 130 cm  Glass. Andrea Pomoa "Impressioni" Detail  Photo: NTMP Ellsworth Kelly "Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance 1" 1951  Via museumsyndicate.com Gerhard Richter "Abstraktes Bild" 1992 Thomas Ruff "Barcelona Pavilion" 2000-2004 Castern Nicolai "Unidisplay"  Via collabcubed.com Vic Muniz "Vic, 2 Years Old, Album." 2014 via designmilk.com Raffaella Ceccarossi "Emerging" 2013 37 x 140 x 12 cm  Smalti and marble. Luca Barberini "Portraits Collection" 2013  Variable size. Smalti and marble. Luca Barberini "Portraits Collection" 2013  Variable size.  Smalti and marble. Luca Barberini "Portraits Collection" 2013 Variable sizes. Smalti and marble. Luca Barberini "Portraits Colection" 2013 Various sizes. Smalti & marble. Photo courtesy MAR Mosaïzm "Gallaxizm" 2013  250 x 250 x 250 cm. Multimedia installation. Mosaïzm "Gallaxiam" 2013 Detail  Photo courtesy MAR Laura Carraro "Breath" 2013  123 x 40 cm.  Stones, marble, tile, silicone tubing, PVC, inverted mirror.  Photo courtesy MAR Laura Carraro "Breath" 2013 Detail   Photo: NTMP Matylda Tracewska "Untitled" 60 x 48 cm. Marble and paint. Matilda Tracewska "Untitled" detail  Photo:  NTMP Benedetta Galli "We Are The 99" 2013 140 x 200 cm  Photos and silicone on canvas. Benedetta Galli "We Are The 99" Detail   Photo courtesy MAR Elena Prosperi "Wakan-Tanka" 2013  60 x 198 cm  Tiffany glass, glass metal leaf, stones, feathers. Gerard Richter "1025 Farben" 1974  254 x 254 cm      Photo via Gerard-Richter.com Thomas Ruff "jpeg icbm01" (2007)  242.6 x 184.8 cm  Photo via davidzwirner.com

Video produced by MAR covering Notte d’Oro 2013, the opening night of RavennaMosaico

In 2013, the

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Comments

  1. Jae Hee Kim

    Hello, I’m Jae Hee Kim.
    I found a mistake.
    The title of my work is “Uncomfortable House” !!!
    It’s my nationality ‘South Korea’.
    Could you please correct it?

    • Of course! I will get on it right away. I was working from information from the exhibit. My apologies for the error.

  2. Magda

    I agree with Luis. Stunning. Each of these pieces prove how versatile mosaic is.

    http://www.whichtranslatesto.wordpress.com

  3. Luis Laso Casas

    Stunning body of work and a promise of what is to be achieved by these young and exciting artists.
    I loved the diversity within the exhibition. Thanks for a great article.
    Luis

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Cement, tile.Kaitis.jpgVadzim Kamisarau "The Main News 3"  2012  50 x 95 cm  Cement, smaltikenawy-memories-full1Keren.jpgKate_KerriganWalkingInRainMatko_KezleInki-400-bimg-kii-blue-grids-in-blue-big.jpgPermafrost+King.jpgAndrej-Koruza-Structured-1-2011-Detailkozachek+Three+Intruding+Fanatics.jpgMichael_Kruzich_SylvesterKazumi Kurihara "Il Libro Legge" (The book reads) 2011 (Japan)Melaine_Lenoelevy-a-man-in-a-waiting-room-300dpi-1000Bett Ann Libby "China Leaf Tea" 2006  13 x 13 x 10 in.  Photo:  David CarasMarco De Luca "La Morte di Ofelia" 2003 123 x 183 x 3 cmLucas.jpgSager.jpgdragonflycompleteMonica_Machado_The_Clothes_Line_2000_260cmCorde-à-linge-Monica-Machado-détailstone-circle-dugald-macinnesMohamad Banawy "Abstract 3" 2010 80 x 80 cm  Clay, glass.MAN2009-Marzi-foto.jpgEaster_Egg_Mosaic_02.jpgAnadoMcLaughlinru paul2.pngHildreth_MeiereCathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, Drinking deer mosaic on northJeroenMeijerMaterNostra2008"More American Gifts:  Grenades"  2005  5.5 x 3.9 x 3.5 in  Ceramic, porcelain, plaster, wire, metal, cement adhesive, grout.the rainJason Middlebrook "Brooklyn SeedsFlaking paint on wooden door, Perthshire, Scotland. Photo: Helen Miles MosaicsAndrea Deszö  "Community Garden"  2006Julian_Modica_zappa.jpgMosaic RhinocerosLynnMoorPipgtailGirlBOMIMG_6541.jpgJinette+Mosaique.jpgMosaïzm "Gallaxiam" 2013 Detail  Photo courtesy MARCleo Mussi "Mind"  2012Silvia_Naddeo-Transition-2012Megumi-Naitoh-4192010-detail-Michael-WelchFamiliarGroundNewton Serenity 2FelicesBalls_4546.jpg8419_1251766378980_1374130919_703135_1818425_n.jpg"Cerulean Rendesvous" Carole Choucair-Oueijan 53.5 x 45 in.    Smalti, 24 karat gold smalti, cristallino, marble, granite111_0424.jpgFamiliarGroundNiki_de_Saint_Phalle_Tarot_Garden114Picasso.TeteFauveSergio-Policicchio-Corpi-celesti-2011"Dama-Dama" (2014) 1385 x 1165 cm.Elena Prosperi "Wakan-Tanka" 2013  60 x 198 cm  Tiffany glass, glass metal leaf, stones, feathers.Allan Punton "The Three Doges" 2014 Inspired by a ghost story by Alberto Toso FeiRebecca+detail.jpgAndjelka Radojevic  My Little ChickadeeGila+Rayberg+Morning+After.jpgSonya Louro do Rego "Fall" 2011 150 x 50 x 25 cm Shells and marble on wood and polystyrene  Photo: NTMP3312140193_3f2f0905ec.jpgNightshirt-Richey.jpegMo-Ringey-Stools-2004Faith Ringgold "Flying Home:  Harlem Heroes and Heroines (Downtown and Uptown)" 1996  Photo via MTA Arts for Transitdiego_rivera1-320x160Anna Rommel "Green Fish"clug romaniaAndrea Sala & Giulia Alecci "Co-musivo" 2013  VideoRuth_Minola_Scheibler_nightflight_024"x4"Peter Rabbit & fence Beatrix Pottermedium_Reminiscence.jpgWINDSTILL+1.jpgGino-Severini-Church-of-St-Mark-Cortona-Mosaic-wiki-cropIlana Shafir WhirlBeneath+1.jpgmail.JPGVox+Sizemore.JPG100_5652.jpgJasna SokolovicSollinger+Old+Growth+2000.jpgCarol Stirton-Broad "From My Sister's Garden #3" 2013 3.5 x 10.5 inPam Stratton "Twin Lights"Hisao Matsuo "Don't Tell What Was Seen In The Woods" 24 x 35"Carol Talkov "What's Inside" 2012  14 x 17 x 4tavonatti+4+close+up.jpgKathy Thaden  The VisitCynthia Toops "Wolf and Dog" 2012 2.75 x 2.75 x .25 in. Plymer clay, sterling silver metalwork by Chuck Domitrovich  Photo:  Michael WelchBrooks Tower "No Pants"  2004  24 x 14 in.Matylda Tracewska "Untitled" 60 x 48 cm. Marble and paint.Matylda Tracewska "Black Square III"  2011  80 x 80 x 4 cm.  Marble, smalti.Crack+true.jpgTunick_07_1Federico UribeVital CU 02vortex+close+up.jpgennisHouse_1428291c.jpgIsaiah Zagar    Photo WikipediaAleksey Zhuchov "Still Life With Bottles" 2012  50.5 x 47 cm  Natural and artificial stone, smalti.